AMANDA FLOWERS

A SELF PORTRAIT, 2020

Oil pastel on wood, 4' x 3'

BROWN NECK, 2020

Oil pastel on paper, 18" x 12"

I feel like I represent a category of people who want to be okay with who they are in the most positive light. I want to be seen as simply different with not having a positive or negative connotation, just being as an individual. Especially in the realm of visual arts there are standards and stereotypes that tend to be seen as negative or positive instead of just “is”. So being a voice that challenges that really matters to my art.

 

I strive to push my audience to go beyond their false beliefs and to see in another perspective. This also challenges me to break the mental walls I have."

A SELF PORTRAIT, 2020

Oil Pastel on Wood, 4' x 3'

BROWN NECK, 2020

Oil Pastel on Paper, 18" x 12"

VERONICA ELIZABETH THOMAS in conversation with AMANDA FLOWERS

THOMAS: Is there a moment, or series of moments, you can recall from childhood, that has shaped the ways in which you engage with your hair?

FLOWERS: My grandmother used to do my hair with much care during my early years; so many moisturizing rituals and an abundance of styles. So, I believe,  naturally,  as I became more aware of my hair texture I realized that the knowledge of the necessary upkeep to maintain my natural curls,  was already embedded in me. Don’t get me wrong, I do still watch Youtube videos to upgrade my styles.

THOMAS: ​PEASY​ is an homage to Black womxnhood. What does honoring your Blackness and womxn-ness in your everyday rituals look like?

FLOWERS: I have a few daily rituals that allow me to hone in on, as well as honor, my Black ancestry, my womxn-ness, and my individuality. Presently, a new ritual I have been developing in my nightly routine is checking in with my emotions. It's about allowing my emotions to be filtered and felt through every notion of my being. This is important to me because my grandmother was taught to ignore her feelings, so I make sure to honor my emotions because she was not supported in doing so.

 

THOMAS: In what ways does your practice elevate your intention?

FLOWERS:  My intentions are to encourage people to feel secure with their life choices, whether it be in the artistic or business aspect. Staying true to myself and my art allows someone else to see another future as a possibility.

 

THOMAS: PEASY​ asks its audience to look beyond the imagery and into the soul of what it means to be a Black womxn - what does being a Black womxn mean / feel like to you?

FLOWERS:  We hold the universe in our hips.

THOMAS: Is there any message, feeling or intention you wish to communicate about your experience of Black womxnhood? 

 

FLOWERS: 

They really want to touch

you,


so don’t let them fool

you,


thinking it ain’t start with you,


thinking something ain't right with

you,


remove their projections, you fly ass

bitch

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